Shawn Sullivan, Massachusetts Real Estate, Medford homes for sale, Somerville homes for sale



23 Cliff Street, Malden, MA 02148

Single-Family

$500,000
Price

7
Rooms
3
Beds
1/1
Full/Half Baths
Do not let this home pass you by! Owner's pride shines throughout this impeccable & spacious home that checks off every item on your wish list. Found in a location that cannot be beat, this gem is within walking distance to Maplewood Square, buses (106 MBTA bus stop), Trafton Park, schools, & offers quick & easy access to Oak Grove T Station. Features a sleek, upgraded eat-in kitchen with white maple cabinets, granite countertops & stainless steel appliances. Amply sized living & dining rooms with lots of natural light & lovely features throughout. Distinctive wood staircase to 2nd level where generous master bedroom & 2 additional flexible bedrooms await. Also offers one full and one half bath. Beautifully maintained & has lots of storage throughout. Outside front & rear decks provide nice space for relaxing. 2 car garage and driveway take care of your parking needs. Great home. Great location.
Open House
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February 15 at 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM
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Location: 23 Cliff Street, Malden, MA 02148    Get Directions

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It’s a competitive selling market and we all know how difficult it can be to entice buyers with your home.

There are a number of ways to highlight the best features of your house. From staging to great real estate photos, marketing your home is a key aspect to ensuring a sale.

However, sometimes sellers miss out on opportunities to give their home a competitive edge in the housing market.

In today’s post, we’re going to talk about some of the features in homes that are major selling points for today’s average buyer. That way, you’ll be able to update your listing and materials so that everyone who looks at your home knows exactly what it has to offer.

1. Location and convenience

Odds are you can find some major location selling points for your home if you think about it. Is your home near grocery stores, hospitals, parks, or major highways? Does it lack the rush hour traffic that other neighborhoods have?

Just because you’ve gotten used to the convenient location of your home doesn’t mean it won’t be appreciated by your potential buyers.

2. Low upkeep and utility costs

If you live in a newer home in your neighborhood, there’s a good chance it will beat out much of the local competition in energy efficiency and maintenance costs. If you’ve recently upgraded energy-related parts of your home (think windows, HVAC, insulation, etc.), you should highlight these upgrades in your listings.

This is also a good time to show off your utility savings. Many utility companies show you how much you spend compared to your neighbors. If your home is energy efficient, don’t be afraid to show off in your listing.

3. Storage space

Ever notice how self-storage facilities seem to be popping up just about everywhere? Storage space is a huge concern for homeowners and buyers alike.

Make sure your photos and listings reflect the amount of storage your home has.

4. Major upgrades

If you’ve recently replaced the septic system, roof, windows, HVAC or other major upgrade, be sure to list the date and cost of the system in your listing. They can help assure potential buyers that they won’t need to make any costly upgrades or repairs anytime soon.

5. Pet and smoke-free

If your home is free of any odors or signs of pets or cigarettes, it will likely be a plus for buyers who are only focusing on homes that are clean and move-in ready.

6. Natural lighting

If your home has a lot of windows or skylights, be sure to include them in your photo and listing. Natural lighting can dramatically improve real estate photos, and it will make your home seem more spacious and welcoming.


A struggle that everyone faces is keeping priorities straight. As careers advance, families grow, and financial responsibilities increase, some priorities fall by the wayside.

One example of how that can happen is with home security. When you have your mind on twenty other things that need to be taken care of this week, it's easy to forget about consistently locking doors, turning on security lights at night, and being observant of suspicious activity or people in your neighborhood.

There are dozens of home security mistakes people make every day, most of which are the result of complacency or a lack of awareness. Probably one of the biggest security blunders many homeowners and renters make is broadcasting the fact that they're away from home, traveling, or planning to leave the house for any period of time.

In many cases, you may be unaware of security breaches you're creating. In an era in which nearly everyone has a social media presence, it's very common to let your guard down and announce on Facebook or another platform that you're planning to go to a high school reunion, a wedding, or a week-long vacation at a Florida theme park.

While sharing personal information on social media or blogs may be one way to keep in touch with friends and family, it's often safer to be a little vague about exact dates and times you're away from home. Once you've returned, there's certainly no harm in providing a full account of your travel adventures, but doing so beforehand can be a little risky -- especially if you haven't set your social media account settings to private

Forgetting to have your mail or newspaper delivery suspended for the duration of your absence is another way people inadvertently advertise the fact that their house is unoccupied. The ideal scenario is to have a trusted neighbor keep an eye on your home while you're gone. That enables them to report any trespassers or other suspicious activity to the police.

Even if you don't have mail or unread newspapers piling up in your mailbox, driveway, or front steps, there's still the chance that an unexpected package will be delivered and left out in the open for passersby to see. You can't always predict when a box, a catalog, or an advertisement is going to be left at your home, so it pays to have a friend, relative, or neighbor check on your house daily to remove any telltale signs that no one's home.

Perhaps the ultimate in home security is to have closed circuit cameras, monitored alarms, and/or a wireless security system installed in your home. Once you get the hang of it, being able to monitor and control different aspects of your home environment remotely can enhance your security, your safety, and your sense of well-being.


This Condo in Everett, MA recently sold for $122,000. This Mid-Rise style home was sold by Shawn Sullivan, Broker Associate, CRS - RE/MAX Andrew Realty Services.


68 Linden St, Everett, MA 02149

Condo

$125,000
Price
$122,000
Sale Price

2
Rooms
1
Beds
1
Baths




Image by Steve Heap from Shutterstock

An active housing market has reduced the number of foreclosed homes in inventory, but there will always be foreclosed homes available to purchase. Many buyers are not aware of what to expect when purchasing a foreclosure. Here are some home truths about buying a distressed home.

You’re not always getting a deal.

Many buyers believe foreclosed homes sell at rock-bottom prices. They expect massive and unrealistic discounts. While the bank may be willing to sell for well below the fair market value, their goal is to recover the loss they incurred when providing the original mortgage. Additionally, foreclosed properties may have long-standing maintenance issues that require a substantial investment to remedy.

The bank may not have the only lien.

A foreclosure removes the primary mortgage debt, but a distressed property may have other claims for money owed in back taxes, for mechanical work and contractors’ fees. A complete title search should tell you if there are liens that need satisfaction when you purchase a property. Your real estate agent can guide you in how to discover unsatisfied liens or judgments against the property

You may find maintenance problems.

Most owners do not simply move out of the property when they can no longer afford to make payments. When an original owner loses income, maintenance often becomes a low priority. And, if they have a medical disaster, a decline in health often means a decline in care for the property. Storm damage, pests, and other hidden issues mean damage to a home that gets overlooked when the owner has different priorities.

You may find vandal activity.

Although there are some stories of angry owners vandalizing the foreclosed property that they invested their life savings into, more often are issues with opportunistic thieves. They remove plumbing and light fixtures, paver stones, and other readily accessible objects from an abandoned property.

Schedule a thorough inspection before you purchase if possible so that you know what you're getting. Your real estate professional specializing in distressed properties can connect you with an unbiased inspector. They will report on your potential new home and help you uncover any hidden costs lurking there.




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